Language by Baptism: Parte Cuatro

Been a few days since I’ve posted. No photos this time. Rather, a quick update on progress. My perspective anyway.

Taking a step back, this program probably looks like a lot of other summer Spanish intensive courses you can find in colleges all over the United States. We’re cramming probably a year’s worth of something like a college course into four weeks, after all. We meet for five class hours a day: the first three to go through a course of study–grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and so on; the fourth for pure conversation; and the fifth for pronunciation and diction.

One big difference here, however, as opposed to taking a course like this in the states, is that we students are able to practice what we’re learning everywhere we go–restaurants, shops, libraries, churches, museums, etc.

A slight complaint is that SMA is actually a very English-friendly town, meaning I don’t have to speak in Spanish 24/7 if I don’t want to; and, believe me, sometimes, especially towards the end of the day, after five intensive hours of study already, it’s very difficult to keep thinking in Spanish. Mental exhaustion settles in. I really would rather communicate in English. So I do. Or, rather, I get lazy and revert to English a lot more often than I should.

Near the border, on the US side, there’s a common kind of dialect called Spanglish. Down here, it’s something like that around here in the late afternoons, only coming from the other side. Gringo-ish, maybe?

Another big difference is the cultural immersion. All around me are the sights, smells, and sounds of beautiful, warm, delicious Mexico. I took a field trip to Guanajuato last Saturday; will take another this Saturday to the only known archeological wonder in this area, La Canada de Virgen; and everyday simply walking to and from the school confronts me with it all.

Indeed, this is not just any old summer intensive Spanish course but truly an immersion experience.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: