Language by Baptism: Parte Dos

As intimated previously, here are two food photos: of today’s lunch at our host’s local restaurante; tortilla soup followed by queso enchiladas con salsa verde:

DSCF3118DSCF3119

Anyway, three days into it now, I’ve experienced a couple of minor disappointments.

In the first place–at the risk of sounding like Hermione Granger–the school decided to cancel its last class of the day for this entire Session. What this means is that we’re done at 5pm instead of 6:20, which is the positive way to look at it. It also means, however, that the Mexican history section has been cancelled, a section entitled “Mexican Literature II,” something I was really looking forward to.

The second disappointment is the other afternoon class, beginning at 3:45, “Folksinging and Folkdancing.” Now, I’m okay with singing, especially folk singing, especially in Spanish. Trouble is, so far it’s only been a social dancing seminar, stress dancing and neither singing nor Spanishing.

Morning classes are nonetheless substantial, solid from 8:30am to 1:45pm.

Entonces . . .

We decided instead of “Folksinging and Folkdancing” today to take in a local botanical garden.

DSCF3120

Leaving the restaurant, we mapped out our walk to some botanical gardens whose name I can’t remember right now (brain’s kind of full at the moment . . .), some 1.5 miles distant. What we didn’t know was that this distance would be entirely uphill, sometimes at a 20% slope. We saw two medium-to-large men try and fail to ride a motorcycle up this slope. Most motorcycles around here have smallish engines, like 150ccs. Still, it was that steep!

Here are a few photos from our ascent via (steep) city streets:

DSCF3121

Looking back. AHA! is directly left of the white sedan. La Boganbilia, our host’s restuarante, is at the other end of the street, several blocks away.

DSCF3122

So, up we go.

DSCF3123

Another look back, SMA’s skyline is quite spectacular.

DSCF3124

And, huffing and puffing (at above 2,000 m/ 6,600 ft in elevation), we make it! Entrance fee, by the way, is 40 pesos, or about $2.20, a US penny per acre.

DSCF3125

Inside we find a trail around the garden and several plants you might guess are in the region.

DSCF3126

Mesquite (for my Texas friends).

DSCF3128

Gatillo (for my friends who like mimosas).

DSCF3130

DSCF3131

And agave!–specia Magna in the top photo; specia Tequila in the bottom (for my friends who like margaritas).

DSCF3129

The property includes a wetland area.

DSCF3132

DSCF3133

And what do you call this? A cactus pond garden?

But the real surprise comes when we encounter the ruins of an eighteenth-century aqueduct, to deliver water to the town once upon a time:

DSCF3134

This is the water source for the aqueduct.

DSCF3135

DSCF3137

DSCF3136

And some of the ruins.

DSCF3138

Here you see the gorge down which the aqueduct traveled. Near the top of the gorge on the far side there is a newer system of pipes to deliver water to SMA, however now also defunct.

A few steps away, I conclude today’s self-made cultural and historical experience with a couple more shots of this beautiful city. Stay tuned for parte tres.

DSCF3139

DSCF3140

Advertisements

One Response to “Language by Baptism: Parte Dos”

  1. Muy bien hecho camarada! Espero que su curiosidad continue a ayudarte! Haber que el alcalde puede ayudarte con la historia.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: